Schreiadler, Aquila pomarina, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Schreiadler, Aquila pomarina, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Schreiadler, Aquila pomarina, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Schreiadler, Aquila pomarina, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Schreiadler, Aquila pomarina, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Schreiadler, Aquila pomarina, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle
Aquila pomarina, Schreiadler, Lesser Spotted Eagle

Lesser Spotted Eagle Webcam - Appeal to support LSE project in Latvia

 

 

Since 2008 Ugis Bergmanis has provided a global audience with realtime footage from nesting Lesser Spotted Eagles. Important data on the breeding biology and diet of the birds has been collected by the project since then. Now, a new project to help the Lesser Spotted Eagles in their most important breeding grounds in Latvia needs support:

Protection of the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Latvia –Conservation work in the most important stronghold of the species needs our support!

Latvia is the most important breeding area for the Lesser Spotted Eagle (LSE)in the world. About 3,600 pairs live here, almost a fifth of the entire world population. For years, various conservation efforts to help the species have been under way. The best known project is the world's first webcam, which has transmitted since 2008 fascinating live images from the life of this shy eagle throughout the breeding season. The project was initiated by the Latvian Lesser Spotted Eagle expert Ugis Bergmanis and has already provided many scientific, conservation and politically significant findings on the birds’ breeding biology.

Under the direction of Ugis another project is now starting which will close an important gap in species protection plans in Latvia: The first raptor care and rehabilitation station in the country is to be built. It is hard to believe, but up to now in the most important country for the species, there has been no permanent and reliable way to help injured eagles and other rare birds (such as the Black Stork, Ural Owl, Golden and White-tailed Eagles) recovering from accidents or injuries and being released back into the wild.

The project is more than sentimentality or animal interest:  it will  make a practical contribution to the protection of endangered species of raptors. Following  the many successful projects listed below,  Ugis aims to fill another gap in the protection scheme of the LSE in its Latvian stronghold.

- monitoring the Latvian LSE population

- building artificial nests where original nests have been destroyed

- creating a network of hundreds of micro-reserves to protect LSE nesting sites all over Latvia

- captive breeding of LSEs in Latvia and releasing them into the wild to support the endangered German LSE population

The philosophy behind all of these measures is the same: For bird species such as the LSE with a long life expectancy combined with a very low reproductive rate, the stability of the entire population depends on every single bird!

The need for the establishment of a professionally operated nursing and rehabilitation centre in Latvia is illustrated by many real examples: Again and again, young LSEs are found whose nests were destroyed in storms or whose nesting trees were accidentally cut during forestry work. Collisions with power lines and traffic accidents also happen. Often the birds’ injuries are relatively mild and a release back into the wild after a few days or weeks of care would be possible. However, due to the lack of a professional station most birds die and this, of course means their future offspring are lost too.

The plans for the rehabilitation centre are well advanced. Building permits for the station exist for a site close to many LSE territories (the ideal environment for the reintroduction of the birds). The structural preparations are also complete. As the project is not supported by public money, it relies entirely on private donations. Help us to fund the station so that next season, injured Lesser Spotted Eagles do not die needlessly because of a lack of basic, proper care.

Any donation is used exclusively for the construction of the station: The maintenance, professional care and feeding of the birds will be done on a volunteer basis by Ugis and his team. You can donate here. Every contribution is important and appreciated, no matter how small. We will soon be publishing  a number of ways to support the project throughthe purchase of photographs.

 

Thank you for your support!